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Seasonal Transitions

Within Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), every season is associated with specific organs, emotions, and an element. The most predominant organs during the fall are the coupled pair of the Lungs and Large Intestine. The emotions associated with this season are grief and sadness; the element is metal. Going beyond just the physical structures in the body, TCM views these organs as systems that play key roles within an individual’s overall health and well-being.


On a physical level, the Lungs are the link between our external and internal environments. They control our respiration and regulate our body’s energy. On the most basic level, they represent survival: inhalation and exhalation.

At the other end sits the Large Intestine who is tasked with maintaining a proper balance of water within the system as well as regulating the bowels through the elimination of waste and toxins.


Grief and sadness are the major players during the fall season. So, any emotional imbalances which arise can manifest in a multitude of ways. Healthy Lung function is associated with clarity of speech, more relaxed and deeper breathing, and the ability to create structure and boundaries. Imbalances within the Lungs can present with physical symptoms such as respiratory issues and decreased immune function or emotional symptoms such as overwhelming grief and sorrow, crying, and the inability to move forward in life. When the Large Intestine is balanced, the individual is better able to move out any physical or emotional stagnation and to gain clarity with this letting go. Conversely, imbalanced Large Intestine energetics can manifest emotionally as one’s inability to let go of certain emotional and behavioral attachments as well as physically, in the form of constipation or diarrhea.


Elementally, Metal signifies the ability to separate the pure from the impure, to eliminate that which no longer serves us so that we can settle deeper into our authentic self. Whether physical or emotional, the Lungs and Large Intestine are the two systems which are responsible for this process of separating and letting go, be it from certain emotions, attachments, or metabolic waste.


The aim of Chinese Medicine is to look at the big picture: how are our systems interrelating and what are the patterns emerging from the potential imbalances? Taking a more holistic approach to health is the key to keeping our systems properly regulated. Therefore, simple steps such as receiving acupuncture, staying hydrated, being more conscious of our diet and nutrition, exercising, finding activities which bring joy and fulfillment, and engaging more within social/community circles all act to foster our best health.


Here at Shore Points Acupuncture, we provide intentional, intuitive, skilled Chinese Medicine treatments utilizing a multitude of modalities including acupuncture, cupping, gua sha, moxibustion, E-stim, Celluma LED Therapy, and aromatherapy to support your transition into the fall season.


Shore Points Acupuncture is located at 508 Main Street, Avon-By-The-Sea. For more information, please visit our website: shorepointsacupuncture.com; send us an email: shorepoints.acu@gmail.com; follow us on Instagram: @shorepointsacupuncture; or call/text: 732.447.1067.






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